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MIC – The Most Common, Yet Pricey Cause of Infrastructure Degradation [Video]

 

Equipment and infrastructure degradation can cost a typical U.S. city millions of dollars per year on pipeline repairing. For a Fortune 500 company and local community, the cost can be even higher, including environmental and PR concerns – i.e. the Prudhoe Bay oil spill incident, exactly 10 years ago.

One of the most common and under-estimated causes of pipeline degradations is microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).


Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC)

by Richard B. Eckert

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a serious corrosion threat that impacts the operating integrity and reliability of assets in the oil and gas, maritime, power generation, and other industries. Yet MIC is also commonly misunderstood, leading to ineffective mitigation programs, wasted resources and deterioration of vital assets.

This video, developed by MIC experts at DNV GL, illustrates mechanisms that can cause MIC and the process by which MIC initiates and propagates over time. Understanding the chemical and microbiological basis for MIC allows DNV GL to help customers design and implement improved mitigation strategies and thereby reduce operating risk. Our experts provide guidance in applying the latest state-of-the-art molecular microbiological methods (MMM) and industry standards to properly diagnose MIC in operating assets and on failed components. With this understanding, MIC can be effectively addressed as part of the overall Corrosion Management System (CMS).

Driven by our purpose of safeguarding life, property and the environment, DNV GL enables organizations to advance the safety and sustainability of their business. Operating in more than 100 countries, our 16,000 professionals are dedicated to helping our customers in the maritime, oil and gas, energy and other industries to make the world safer, smarter and greener.



Bonus Reading:

The Undeniable Link between Biological Growth & Pipeline Degradation


Eric Douglass

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