Most Wanted Microbe – Escherichia coli

  From the editor: This is the inaugural post in an ongoing series profiling microorganisms of particular significance in water and wastewater systems. In this series we will cover microorganisms of many types including some that are beneficial, inhibitory and pathogenic.  Escherichia coli or E. coli is a species of bacteria commonly found in the… Read More

Using ATP in a Legionella Water Management Plan

  Between December 2014 and September 2015 there were three clusters of Legionnaires’ disease outbreaks in the Bronx, New York City. Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia, is caused by inhaling aerosolized water containing certain pathogenic strains of Legionella bacteria. Legionella thrive in warm, stagnant water with low disinfection residuals such as hot water… Read More

Water and the Olympics

  At the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, hundreds of millions of people around the world watched as athletes competed in dozens of sports over two weeks. For some sports, water (usually in the form of snow or ice) is crucial. Where the Summer Olympics need pools and lakes filled with clean water for… Read More

The Cost of High Solids in Your Wastewater Treatment Plant

  Conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) operate with solids (mixed liquor suspended solids ­– MLSS) concentrations ranging from approximately 1500 to 5000 mg/L. In membrane bioreactors (MBRs), typical MLSS concentrations are even higher (10,000 to 12,000 mg/L). A higher concentration can be advantageous as they allow for smaller aeration tanks while performing the… Read More

Drinking Water – A Global Concern

  Issues related to drinking water and municipal water systems are all over the news these days. In North America, the troubles that Flint, Michigan has faced with its water supply and distribution system have been in the headlines for a number of years now. Government officials continue to struggle to replace aging infrastructure and… Read More

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal – Who’s doing the work?

  Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was first documented in the early 1970’s. Traditionally it has been understood that EBPR requires a first stage anaerobic zone that is free of nitrate and nitrite. In the anaerobic zone, phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAO) utilize energy from stored polyphosphate to assimilate volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and produce polyhydroxybutyrate… Read More

Investigating biomass density in biological activated carbon media with 2nd Generation ATP

  Editor’s note: This post was authored by one of our clients – Research Laboratory Services (RLS). They are a research, consultancy, and laboratory testing service provider based in Melbourne, Australia with offices in the USA and New Zealand. With over 20 years of experience in the portable and wastewater treatment industries, RLS specializes in… Read More