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Test Your Knowledge: Drinking Water & Lead

Drinking water and lead is not a new topic of discussion for us.

Recently, we’ve looked at the issue of lead toxicity in municipal drinking water systems. We’ve touched on several recent cases that garnered a lot of media attention, including Flint, MichiganMontreal, Quebec and Newark, New Jersey. Now that we’ve seen some of the cities where this problem is happening, let’s consider the facts related to drinking water safety and lead contamination.

 

Test your knowledge with this short quiz. 

 

1. True or False: You shouldn’t shower or bathe in lead-contaminated water.

 

2. The chemical process that can cause lead to be transferred from service lines to water is called:
a. Erosion
b. Displacement
c. Corrosion
d. Nitrification 

 

3. The effects of lead poisoning on this ancient civilization are controversial. Some researchers believe that toxic levels of lead in a large number of citizens led to widespread health problems and ultimately the disintegration of the society. Other experts think the effects of lead are overblown. What civilization are we referring to:
a. Aztec
b. Minoan
c. Persian
d. Roman

 

4. Ingesting lead can cause seriouslong-term neurological effects. One area of the brain that’s associated with learning and memory is particularly susceptible. What brain region are we referring to:
a. Hippocampus
b. Hypothalamus
c. Amygdala
d. Occipital Lobe 

 

5. In this field of research, scientists are considering how lead exposure may actually change a person’s genome and cause negative health impacts to be passed on to future generations. The field of study is called:

a. Pharmacogenomics 
b. Epigenetics
c. Cytogenetics
d. Enzymology 

 

6. This method of home water filtration is generally considered to be the most effective way of removing lead from domestic water.

a. Infrared Disinfection
b. Distillation
c. Reverse Osmosis
d. Boiling 

 

7. True or False: Exposure to lead paint particles is a more common vector for human ingestion than drinking lead-contaminated water. 

 

At LuminUltrawe’re focused on first understanding water-related concerns, then working towards an effective solution. We hope this quiz helped you expand your understanding of lead toxicity. 

 

1. False. Human skin doesn’t generally absorb lead from bath or shower water. Just don’t drink it.

2. C

3. D

4. A

5. B

6. C

7. True  


Stacey Pineau

Clearly explaining complex topics has been Stacey’s focus for close to 25 years now. She helps plan how best to reach the right people, then works to provide them with relevant information that’s easy to understand. Stacey is a team player with an entrepreneurial spirit. She has broad experience that spans the private and public sectors. A lover of words, Stacey has a slightly irrational love of the library and a personal collection of way too many books and magazines. She lives in Fredericton with her husband Ray, their two children and dog Scouty.

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